5 ‘domains’ of an IEP

Looking back over my daughter’s school papers over the years, it has been interesting to see the ‘evolution’ of her IEP.
Her IEP primary exceptionality has changed over the years from “Developmentally Delayed” to “Autism Spectrum Disorder”.  Her secondary exceptionalities have grown to include Occupational Therapy, Language Impairment, and Speech Impairment. There are 5 “domains” which are ‘instructional structure’ in which the school system has.  She requires direct goals towards each of these domains.
Because of the extent of her IEP, she is eligible for a scholarship from our school system.  This is allowing us to send her to a small private Christian school starting in the fall of 2010 and to pay for private speech therapy every week.  God is good!

Curriculum and Learning

10/2007 – She will independently write using a tripod grasp and a controlled movement, without prompting, 8 out of 10 observations with 80% accuracy
10/2007 – She will accurately count objects from one to ten with 1 to 1 correspondance, continue a simple pattern without prompting, and will identify diamond, triangle, and rectangle shapes, with 80% accuracy over 5 consecutive observations.
3/2010 – She will independently add/subtract single digit numbers with the addend/subtrahend of 0-3 with 85% accuracy on curriculum tests over 9 consecutive weeks.
3/2010 – She will discriminate the values of more, less/equal with 85% accuracy on curriculum tests over 9 consecutive weeks.
3/2010 – She will increase her reading vocabulary from 85 words to 150 words, 3/5 trials over 9 consecutive weeks.

Social Emotional Behavior

10/2007 – She will appropriately participate within the classroom by using words without hands with teachers and peers while maintaining appropriate inside volume and body movement, 80% of the school day over 5 observations.
3/2010 – She will self-regulate her behavior in order to participate safely in activities on school campus throughout the school day, 3/5 trials over 9 consecutive weeks.

Independent Functioning
10/2007 – She will successfully complete an art project which includes cutting with accuracy on a curved line, and glueing a cut out shape to the appropriate spot on her paper, with minimal adult assistance, 8 of 10 observations.

10/2007 – She will increase self help care skills by independently completing a toileting routine, with minimal adult prompting, open lunch room containers, and walk independently in the hallways, 8 out of 10 observations.

3/2010 – She will copy teacher given sentences from board onto standard first grade paper maintaining proper line placement, with less than 2 errors per sentence in 4 of 5 informal assessments.

Health Care

10/2007 – Due to developmental delays, high levels of heavy metals, and seizures, she requires assistance to support her medical needs.  She requires assistance with her leg brace after rest and pool as she has difficulty getting the small pieces into place and putting her shoe on over the brace.  She also must stay well hydrated due to her seizure medication and should be encouraged to drink throughout the day.  She tends to eat well, but not to drink fluids, so prompting is required.
3/2010 – She requires daily assistance to support her medical needs.  She must stay well hydrated due to her seizure medication and should be encouraged to drink throughout the day.  She tends to eat well but not to drink fluids so prompting is required.  Monitoring and reporting of seizure activity during the day is required.  She tends to have additional seizures when ill, when receiving other medications, and when medications are changed.  She takes medication at school.

Communication

10/2007 – She will use action words, prepositions and adjectives to comment during language activities and respond to questions in simple 5 word sentences with 80% accuracy over 4 consecutive sessions.

3/2010 – She will form complete sentences during language activities in 8 of 10 opportunities across 4 consecutive informal observations.
3/2010 – She will produce /l/, “th” and “sh” sound in all word positions during structured activities for 8 out of 10 opportunities over 4 observations.
3/2010 – She will answer questions related to herself/her environment in 8 our of 10 opportunities across 4 consecutive informal observations.
3/2010 – She will identify location concepts during language activities 8 out of 10 opportunities across 4 consecutive informal observations.
3/2010 – She will name objects related to an activity or leson upon request in 8 of 10 opportunities across 4 consecutive informal observations.

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Interesting to note – as I was looking through my daughter’s notebook of school and medical paperwork I found when she was 2 years, 7 months old she took a test called the Pre School Language – 4.  I just happened to have my son’s last speech therapy evaluation letter sitting there – he was tested at 2 years, 7 months with the exact same test.  Here are the results:
Receptive language:
  • Rosebud – SS 75, 5%
  • Little Turkey – SS 78, 7%
Expressive language:
  • Rosebud – SS 67, 1%
  • Little Turkey – SS 69, 2%
Basically, a SS score of 100 is the exact average of all the 2 yr, 7 month old kids.  Between 85 – 115 is normal, but anything less than 85 is abnormally low.  The numbers are the percentile rankings.  Out of 100 kids, Rosebud would be at the bottom 5th percentile in receptive language, and Little Turkey slightly better – in the 7th.  I think Little Turkey’s is actually higher than that.  But the expressive language is interesting.  They are about the same at this point.  But the big difference is that Little Turkey wants to talk, and he is really starting to get excited that I understand him.  He comes up to me to snuggle and talk now.  Rosebud rarely ever did that at his age.
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